Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Committee

Matthew Wixson, MD

Matthew Wixson, MD

Committee Chair
Faculty
Shay Hollamon

Shay Aboutawila, MPA

Staff

Diversity is important to me because it allows people regardless of color to feel safe and be at peace when experiencing everyone’s differences. Diversity allows us to coexist as humans and allows us to thrive in every level of our education and work setting. Respecting diversity allows leadership to see people as people who have lives and not just numbers on a spreadsheet. When we have diversity we value each other and our objective is more clear than ever. With the power of diversity we tend to communicate better, listen without interruptions or biases. With diversity we’re more creative and more powerful when we can unite together.

 

Genevieve Bell

Genevieve Bell

Staff

Within health care, like other areas of life, marginalized people routinely face discrimination and prejudice while the resulting negative impacts are ignored, downplayed and rationalized. I want to serve on this committee to challenge this norm and promote an inclusive, equitable culture within our department and beyond.

Ben Cloyd, MD

Ben Cloyd, MD

Faculty

Diversity is of critical importance to me, as each step towards a representative, inclusive community brings us closer to our foundational dreams. At Michigan Medicine, diversity helps us to provide the best possible care to the most patients, and is crucial as we strive to deliver exceptional care, education, and research breakthroughs to our state, country, and world. We simply cannot accomplish these goals without a diverse team, and our differences serve to build and strengthen us.

Jude Divers, MD

Jude Divers, MD

Faculty
Neal Duggal, MD

Neal Duggal, MD

Faculty

I feel that diversity brings together new ideas, perspectives and experiences. It allows people to learn from each other and develop more respect and understanding for other cultures. Through respect, acceptance and appreciation we can better relate to our patients and  break through disparities in health care.

Lisa Downs

Lisa Downs

CRNA

Diversity is important to me for many reasons. As a second generation American, I saw what my parents went through to assimilate to American culture. When my mother was a child, she gave up speaking Arabic because she was afraid, she once told me you were thought of as a "dirty immigrant."  I want to live in a society that celebrates and embraces our differences. I enjoy learning about everyone's unique life view. This can only be accomplished through inclusion and diversity. A diverse department will ensure that this can happen.

Bob Fraumann, MD

Bob Fraumann, MD

Faculty
Michelle Hill, MSN

Michelle Hill, MSN

Anesthesia Technician Manager

Communication among diverse populations is important because it promotes sharing of experiences, understanding various perspectives and creating new ideas.

David Hovord, MD

David Hovord, MD

Faculty
Bernie Jiang, MD

Bernie Jiang, MD

Faculty
Anderson Lee, IV

Anderson Lee, IV

Medical Student
Marissa Miller

Marissa Miller

Anesthesia Tech
Mukilan Muthuswami, MD

Mukilan Muthuswami, MD

Faculty
Mary Neff

Mary Neff

CRNA

I think diversity is vital in a world that encourages and appreciates each person's potential contributions to improve what little time we are inhabitants. We can strive to optimize each person’s experience within a collective body of knowledge, wisdom, courage, and understanding with acceptance of each other’s differences.

Dr. Emily Peoples, right, with her family

Emily Peoples, MD

Faculty

I love learning; not just about medicine, but about other people, ideas and experiences. For me, diversity is vital because it exposes us to new ideas and ways of thinking, leading us to question why we are doing things a certain way and challenge the status quo to promote continual improvement in our society. Within our department, diversity allows for: safer patient-centered care, the promotion of creativity and dialogue, and continuous personal growth with the end goal being a more equitable and inclusive environment.

Jackie Ragheb, MD

Jackie Ragheb, MD

Faculty
Lauryn Rochlen, MD

Lauryn Rochlen, MD

Faculty

Our department is filled with amazing people, stories, values and cultures.  It is time to celebrate this diversity and use it as a path forward to create a stronger, more cohesive department.

 

 
Lauren Siemer, MD

Lauren Siemer, MD

Resident
TJ Stropp, MD, and family

T.J. Stropp, MD

Resident

Growing up in a diverse area of South Florida taught me to appreciate ethnicities, cultures and life experiences that are different than my own. Cherishing variations in others as part of the beauty of humanity is a large part of why I wanted to be a physician in the first place. My goal is to promote an inclusive environment of learning and respect both inside and outside of the hospital for patients, their families, and providers.

 

Fitz Tavernier Jr., MD, MPH

Fitz Tavernier, Jr., MD

Resident
Magnus Teig, MD

Magnus Teig, MD

Faculty

We need to be judged by how we work and how we treat others, and not by how others may see us. We need to be aware of the injustice in our world and how that impacts so much upon the health of our patients and the relationships that we have with those around us. Together, recognizing our problems and realizing that what some people use to divide us actually brings us much closer together will improve things for everyone. There is so far to go, but getting started is necessary to get anywhere.

Giancarlo Vanini, MD

Giancarlo Vanini, MD

Faculty

As a researcher, I enjoy, appreciate and have very much benefited from working with people of different backgrounds, experience and views. There is a lot of work to be done to advance in this area, and I am grateful for the opportunity to represent my fellow researchers and offer my perspective.

James Weinberg, MD

James Weinberg, MD

Resident
Geneva White, MD

Geneva White, MD

Resident

Learning to recognize bias and disparity (both in myself, my colleagues and the system around me) is a fundamental part of my training as a resident. It is not possible for me to be an adequate physician, nor the hospital to provide suitable care, if we do not see our patients for who they are and what they have overcome.

Vu Willey

Vu Willey, MS

Staff

An organization that lacks diversity of backgrounds, experiences and minds cannot achieve its full potential.  Not only would it be a disservice to that organization, but to everyone that organization serves. Unconscious bias is a fact of life, and only through diligent work can we start to mitigate its long-standing damage.

Heather Wourman

Heather Wourman

Staff
Lara Zisblatt

Lara Zisblatt, EdD, MA, PMME

Staff

As a professional educator, I believe diversity is essential to the learning environment. It is only through diversity of opinion that we can evolve