Available Grant Opportunities

 

Week of Nov. 5th-9th, 2018

Check back often for weekly updates

 

INTERNAL GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

Internal Funding Opportunities & Limited Submission Grants:

 

A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute – Innovation Programs: Phenotyping in the Clinical Setting (Award amount variable, rolling deadline).  

http://www.taubmaninstitute.org/science/taubman-institute-innovation-program/ 

The Taubman Institute is seeking to support new or existing teams of scientists to develop novel and impactful approaches to integrate their research programs into the clinic setting. The goal is to perform systematic, multiscale phenotyping to gain insights into individual variation in the susceptibility, progression, course, or outcomes of disease. The institute will partner with investigators to support the development and implementation of their research programs. This will include, but not be limited to, development of a research plan, identification of research partners within and external to U-M, infrastructure and database development, support for clinician and ancillary personnel in the clinic, clinical data collection, biological specimen collection, remote data collection, initiation of research plan, and data analysis. Our goal is to make every patient a research subject, and to define the genetic, environmental, behavioral and other components of individuals that contribute to their distinct emergent property related to health and disease. The goal is to also utilize the data to stratified an individual in order apply interventions that lead to the prevention, improved treatment, or cure of disease. The institute anticipates investing up to $2.5 million per year to support the funded projects. What are the criteria for funding? Impact on improving the lives of patients; Innovation in understanding the variability in onset or progression of disease, and reasons for differential response to treatment; Potential for future funding by the NIH or other external agencies; Potential for increased reimbursement for care by insurance companies, or cost savings to the medical system; and, Enhanced interactions with basic or other science disciplines (teams). Letter of intent:  Description of the proposed program. Who is going to work together and what will be their roles? Have you worked together in the past? Where do you want to perform this work? What infrastructure is needed to accomplish the goals? Who will you need to partner with to succeed? What are the present barriers to your success? What are your plans for downstream funding? Note: not all of these points must be addressed in the LOI. We seek to understand your vision for bringing science into the clinic. The main request here is for an outline of what you want to do and why it will be impactful. There is no deadline. Letters of intent are accepted on a rolling basis, and should be submitted to managing director Grace Wu (glwu@umich.edu). We encourage questions. You may contact us with written questions through Grace Wu (glwu@umich.edu). We’re happy to meet with individuals or teams to discuss ideas.


 

EXTERNAL GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation – Leadership for Better Health: National Program Center 2018 Call for Proposals ($8 million award, deadline December 13th, 2018).  https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/funding-opportunities/2018/leadership-for-better-health-npc.html?rid=0034400001rm28IAAQ&et_cid=1523687  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Health Policy Research Scholars Program (HPRS) is a four-year national leadership development program for full-time doctoral students from nonclinical, academic disciplines with a policy focus—students who are committed to ensuring their research is aligned with the health needs of communities. The program is focused on researchers who want to improve health, well-being, and equity; challenge long-standing, entrenched systems; exhibit new ways of working; collaborate across disciplines and sectors; and engage others outside of the research community. By providing leadership development training, supporting opportunities to practice new behaviors, and learning to work in teams, HPRS will develop a new cadre of research leaders who will build a Culture of Health in their disciplines and communities. The national program center (NPC) will oversee all aspects of Health Policy Research Scholars, and the program director will provide oversight for the program center. The roles and responsibilities of the HPRS national program center include: Recruiting Applicants and Reviewing Applications; Developing and Overseeing Program Curriculum; Transferring and Integrating the Existing Cohorts; Fostering Interdisciplinary Exchange, Network-Building, and Collaboration; Developing, Engaging and Managing and External Advisory Committee (NAC); Collaborating With Other NPCs to Maximize Impact of RWJF's Signature Leadership Programs; and, Supporting the Culture of Health Vision. Total Awards: The total anticipated annual funding level for HPRS at full implementation and full enrollment will be up to $8 million, which includes the annual program center funding of up to $3.2 million and scholar stipends. The stipend for the current program participants is $30,000 per scholar, per year, for up to four years. The applicant is expected to propose a stipend amount that adequately supports the participant and, coupled with other program costs, does not exceed the up-to-$8 million budget for the program at full enrollment. Key Dates: November 14, 2018 (3–4 p.m. ET): Optional applicant webinar. Registration is required. December 13, 2018 (3 p.m. ET): Deadline for receipt of brief proposals.
 
PCORI:
  • Implementation of Findings from PCORI’s Major Research Investments ($2.5 million award, Letter of Intent deadline January 24th, 2019).  https://www.pcori.org/funding-opportunities/announcement/implementation-findings-pcoris-major-research-investments-cycle-1 This PFA seeks to fund meaningful implementation projects that promote the uptake of peer-reviewed findings from specific, high-priority PCORI initiatives—in the context of the body of related evidence—and make these findings more actionable and accessible to patients, clinicians, or other targeted decision makers and healthcare stakeholders at the point of care or in other decision settings. All proposed implementation projects are expected to: Incorporate active, multi-component strategies that will lead to uptake and integration of PCORI evidence into real world practice settings. Activities may include, but should not focus on, development of tools and materials as part of these strategies. Target specific end-users who have a clear interest in, and would be able to benefit from, using the evidence. Adapt findings as needed to facilitate uptake in the proposed settings, and accomplish scale-up (to reach larger numbers) and/or scale-out (to reach broader audiences, including diverse populations and settings), as applicable. Demonstrate commitment and buy-in from proposed implementation sites–including frontline staff critical to the success of the project as well as leadership—to provide a supportive context and culture for undertaking the proposed project. In addition, projects should involve regional and national stakeholder organizations positioned to extend impact to broader venues. Be guided by an established conceptual model or framework, and where possible, by evidence regarding effective strategies for implementing evidence-based practices and interventions. Include a rigorous evaluation plan that documents: 1) Successful execution of the implementation strategy 2) Impact of the implementation project on healthcare and health outcomes as feasible and appropriate within the project scope. Each release of this PFA will identify selected published, peer-reviewed patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research (CER) evidence as the focus for implementation. We anticipate that selected findings will emerge regularly from PCORI’s targeted funding initiatives and Pragmatic Clinical Studies, which address topics that have been identified as priority areas for PCORI research funding. In addition, PCORI may identify findings from PCORnet Demonstration Studies or from other selected PCORI-funded studies as the focus of implementation efforts under this PFA. For the Cycle 1 2019 PFA, PCORI has identified two areas of eligible evidence, each of which is the focus of an important PCORI-funded study. The goal of the proposed implementation projects under this PFA is to further awareness of this evidence and its use in practice. 1) The use of narrow-spectrum versus broad-spectrum antibiotics to treat children’s acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) 2) Daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has not been shown to improve health outcomes for non-insulin dependent patients with type 2 diabetes. Total Costs: Up to $2.5 million. Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline: January 24, 2019 by 5 p.m. (ET).
 
  • Implementation of Effective Shared Decision Making Approaches in Practice Settings ($1.5 million award, Letter of Intent deadline June 19th, 2019). https://www.pcori.org/funding-opportunities/announcement/implementation-effective-shared-decision-making-approaches  In past releases of this Shared Decision Making PFA, applicants were required to implement PCORI results available at the time of the application due date. Starting Cycle 2 2019, applicants will be required to implement PCORI results available at the time of the Letter of Intent (LOI)  due date. Specifically, (1) a draft final research report pertaining to the original PCORI-funded research award must have been accepted for entry in the peer-review process by PCORI, or (2) a manuscript reporting the PCORI results being proposed for implementation must have been formally accepted for publication by a peer-reviewed scientific journal before the LOI due date. This PFA is intended to promote the targeted implementation and systematic uptake of shared decision making (SDM) in healthcare settings, in line with PCORI’s goal of supporting patients in making informed decisions about their care. For this PFA, PCORI defines an SDM strategy as an intervention or approach that draws on and presents evidence to inform patients of available treatment options and their risks and benefits, and either engages patients in a decision-making process with their clinician or promotes their ability to engage in such a process.  Total Direct Costs: $1.5 million. Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline: June 19, 2019 by 5 p.m. (ET)
 
  • Engagement Award: Dissemination Initiative ($300,000 award, Letter of Intent deadline February 1st, 2019).  https://www.pcori.org/funding-opportunities/announcement/engagement-award-dissemination-initiative Through this award, PCORI seeks to fund projects designed by organizations and communities with established relationships with end users to disseminate the findings from PCORI-funded studies - on their own or as part of the body of existing evidence relevant to the PCORI-funded research findings. For the purposes of this award, we define dissemination as the intentional, active process of identifying target audiences and tailoring communication strategies to increase awareness and understanding of evidence and to motivate its use in policy, practice, and individual choices. Total Costs: Award total costs may not exceed $300,000. Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline: February 1, 2019 by 5:00 p.m. (ET)
 
  • Engagement Award: Capacity Building ($250,000 award, Letter of Intent deadline February 1st, 2019).  https://www.pcori.org/funding-opportunities/announcement/engagement-award-capacity-building  The Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award: Capacity Building program, a research support—not research—funding opportunity, is now accepting applications (letters of inquiry) for projects up to two years in duration, and up to $250,000 in total costs. These projects will build a community of individuals and organizations better able to participate in PCOR/CER, and/or develop infrastructure and partnerships to disseminate PCORI-funded research results. Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline: February 1, 2019 by 5 p.m. (ET)
 
Simons Foundation – Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) 2019 Research Award ($1.3 million award, deadline January 11th, 2019).  https://www.sfari.org/grant/research-awards-request-for-applications/ Grants awarded through this RFA are intended to provide support for the investigation of key unresolved research questions in autism, particularly those that connect etiology to brain function and behavior. Unlike SFARI Pilot Awards, risk and novelty are welcome but are not required criteria for the proposal to be considered meritorious. Competitive applications will have preliminary data or other relevant groundwork that justifies substantial investment on the proposed topic. The maximum budget is $1,300,000 over a period of up to four years. Application Deadline: January 11, 2019.
 
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation:
  • Advancing Gene Editing Technologies and Tools for Cystic Fibrosis: Collaborative Research Grant ($750,000+ award, deadline March 12th, 2019).  https://proposalcentral.altum.com/GrantOpportunities.asp?GMID=14  As an outcome of a CF gene editing workshop held over the summer, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation announces a Request for Applications (RFA) to identify and support highly meritorious proposals in gene editing that offer potential to repair or circumvent CFTR mutations in individuals with CF.  A key concept that emerged from the workshop was that investigators without experience in CF research would be more inclined to become involved if access to CF tools and reagents, as well as CF knowledge, were available.  To bring new technologies to the CF field, investigators without experience in CF research are encouraged to apply. Collaborative, synergistic projects are considered particularly valuable when bringing together investigators with complementary expertise to facilitate development and application of editing strategies. Proposals will focus on exploring technologies related to gene editing and generating tools for assessing editing.  These include, but are not limited to, studies aimed at: Creating tools, including animal models, cell lines or organoids, that will be generally applicable and facilitate or accelerate development and assessment of various gene editing strategies; Developing and optimizing novel gene editing technology platforms and strategies to target the CFTR gene locus; Improving our understanding of potential effects of CFTR gene editing on gene and chromatin topology as related to regulation of CFTR expression; Developing and applying assays to assess off-target effects and adverse events of CFTR gene editing in vitro and/or in vivo; Developing biological endpoints and assays for early in vivo efficacy signals of CFTR gene editing; Understanding and developing assays to monitor potential immune responses to gene editing.  This may include responses to the delivery vehicle, cargo, or CFTR protein; Utilizing CF and/or non-CF animal models to address optimal delivery approaches, appropriate cell targets for long-term correction, dosing, safety, and phenotypic correction of CF pathology; Identifying the threshold of CFTR gene editing needed to reach therapeutic relevance; and, Identifying and overcoming barriers for delivery of gene editing cargo into cells relevant to CF. Funding limits are up to US$750,000 per year for collaborative research efforts (maximum US$250,000 per project per year within the collaborative project) for up to three (3) years.  Up to US$25,000 additional funds may be may be requested for administrative support of multi-project programs, with justification, plus eight percent (8%) indirect costs.  Application Deadline: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at 5:00 PM (ET) 
 
  • Advancing Gene Editing Technologies and Tools for Cystic Fibrosis: Pilot and Feasibility Award ($150,000 award, deadline March 12th, 2019).  https://proposalcentral.altum.com/GrantOpportunities.asp?GMID=14 As an outcome of a CF gene editing workshop held over the summer, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation announces a Request for Applications (RFA) to identify and support highly meritorious proposals in gene editing that offer potential to repair or circumvent CFTR mutations in individuals with CF.  A key concept that emerged from the workshop was that investigators without experience in CF research would be more inclined to become involved if access to CF tools and reagents, as well as CF knowledge, were available.  To bring new technologies to the CF field, investigators without experience in CF research are encouraged to apply. Proposals will focus on exploring technologies related to gene editing and generating tools for assessing editing.  These include, but are not limited to, studies aimed at: Creating tools, including animal models, cell lines or organoids, that will be generally applicable and facilitate or accelerate development and assessment of various gene editing strategies;   Developing and optimizing novel gene editing technology platforms and strategies to target the CFTR gene locus; Improving our understanding of potential effects of CFTR gene editing on gene and chromatin topology as related to regulation of CFTR expression; Developing and applying assays to assess off-target effects and adverse events of CFTR gene editing in vitro and/or in vivo; Developing biological endpoints and assays for early in vivo efficacy signals of CFTR gene editing; Understanding and developing assays to monitor potential immune responses to gene editing.  This may include responses to the delivery vehicle, cargo, or CFTR protein; Utilizing CF and/or non-CF animal models to address optimal delivery approaches, appropriate cell targets for long-term correction, dosing, safety, and phenotypic correction of CF pathology;  Identifying the threshold of CFTR gene editing needed to reach therapeutic relevance; and, Identifying and overcoming barriers for delivery of gene editing cargo into cells relevant to CF. Funding of up to US$75,000 per year, plus eight percent (8%) indirect costs may be requested. Awards may be approved for up to a two-year period. Application Deadline: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 by 5:00 PM (ET)
 
  • Advancing Gene Editing Technologies and Tools for Cystic Fibrosis: Postdoctoral Research Award ($128,550 award, deadline March 12th, 2019).  https://proposalcentral.altum.com/GrantOpportunities.asp?GMID=14 Postdoctoral research fellowships are offered for support of postdoctoral research training related to CF. The intent of these awards is to enable research training in new research areas and methods to advance the scientific knowledge of the applicant and to collect data to enable their transition into an independent research career. As an outcome of a CF gene editing workshop held over the summer, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation announces a Request for Applications (RFA) to identify and support highly meritorious proposals in gene editing that offer potential to repair or circumvent CFTR mutations in individuals with CF.  A key concept that emerged from the workshop was that investigators without experience in CF research would be more inclined to become involved if access to CF tools and reagents, as well as CF knowledge, were available.  To bring new technologies to the CF field, investigators without experience in CF research are encouraged to apply. The purpose of this RFA is to and support training of outstanding post-doctoral researchers who are engaged in gene editing that offer potential to repair or circumvent CFTR mutations in individuals with CF. Proposals will focus on exploring technologies related to gene editing and generating tools for assessing editing.  These include, but are not limited to, studies aimed at: Creating tools, including animal models, cell lines or organoids, that will be generally applicable and facilitate or accelerate development and assessment of various gene editing strategies;   Developing and optimizing novel gene editing technology platforms and strategies to target the CFTR gene locus; Improving our understanding of potential effects of CFTR gene editing on gene and chromatin topology as related to regulation of CFTR expression; Developing and applying assays to assess off-target effects and adverse events of CFTR gene editing in vitro and/or in vivo; Developing biological endpoints and assays for early in vivo efficacy signals of CFTR gene editing; Understanding and developing assays to monitor potential immune responses to gene editing.  This may include responses to the delivery vehicle, cargo, or CFTR protein; Utilizing CF and/or non-CF animal models to address optimal delivery approaches, appropriate cell targets for long-term correction, dosing, safety, and phenotypic correction of CF pathology;  Identifying the threshold of CFTR gene editing needed to reach therapeutic relevance; and, Identifying and overcoming barriers for delivery of gene editing cargo into cells relevant to CF. Awards may be approved for up to a two-year period.  Funding for Year 2 is contingent upon submission and approval of a renewal progress report and the availability of funds. Application Deadline: Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at 5:00 PM (ET)
 
Transportation Research Board – Evaluation of Roadside Crash Injury Metrics in MASH ($400,000 award, deadline December 20th, 2018).  https://apps.trb.org/cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=4572 The simplified point-mass, flail-space model (FSM) was developed in 1981 by Michie and is currently used in the AASHTO Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) crash test procedures to assess vehicle occupant injury risk in roadside hardware crash tests. Similar Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand crash test standards also use the FSM. European CEN procedures use a variation of the FSM in conjunction with the Acceleration Severity Index (ASI) to gauge occupant injury risk. Both metrics are used in roadside crash tests as a substitute for an instrumented anthropometric crash test dummy (ATD). Using an ATD in MASH certification compliance testing would significantly increase the cost of crash testing. Because of advancements in vehicle design, these methods to evaluate occupant injury risk in roadside hardware crashes should be reevaluated. In frontal crashes, the flail-space crash injury metric might be too stringent because it does not consider that occupants are now required to wear seat belts, airbags are used as supplementary restraint systems, and vehicles have crumple zones, all specifically designed to provide controlled ridedown decelerations. In contrast, in side crashes, the flail-space model, which does not account for intrusion, may not be sufficiently stringent. Despite their long use in the evaluation of occupant risk in full-scale crash tests of roadside safety hardware, there is little information correlating either FSM or ASI to occupant injury. FSM predictions might be unrepresentative of the injury risk experienced by occupants in modern vehicles. The newer ASI was designed for belted occupants, but has not been validated for occupant injury risk in the current vehicle fleet. In addition, both FSM and ASI are acceleration-based measures which are most suited to head and chest impacts. They are less than ideal for predicting the risk of leg injuries, such as those observed in some end terminal collisions. Also, neither metric is suited for predicting injury in crashes where the occupant compartment is compromised, including broken side windows in rigid and semi-rigid barrier impacts and A-pillar cutting that can occur in crashes with cable barrier. Research is needed to compare predictions from the current MASH occupant risk procedure with data from crash tests and real world crash events where longitudinal and lateral decelerations have been measured with instrumentation in vehicles impacting roadside safety hardware. Evaluation of alternative vehicle-based methods of determining occupant injury risk is also needed. The key anticipated products are revised MASH occupant risk tolerance values and an improved method of determining occupant injury risk in roadside hardware crash tests. Objective: The objective of this research is to compare predictions from the current MASH occupant risk model and alternative models with data from crash tests and real-world crash events where longitudinal and lateral decelerations have been measured with instrumentation in vehicles impacting roadside safety hardware. Required deliverables for consideration by the AASHTO Technical Committee on Roadside Safety (TCRS) are: An assessment of the MASH occupant risk tolerance values relative to occupant injury risk type as defined by current driver demographics; Proposed adjustments to current risk tolerance values, if needed; Development of an improved method of determining occupant injury risk in roadside hardware crash tests for incorporation in MASH, if needed; and, A proposed roadmap for future research to aid in possible updates of the evaluation method in MASH or to incorporate an alternative method in MASH.
 
Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation – Surgical Skills Simulation Training for Residents Research Grant ($300,000 award, Letter of Intent deadline December 14th, 2018).  https://www.oref.org/grants-and-awards/grant-programs/research-specific-grants/OREF-ABOS-Grant?utm_source=Research+Community&utm_campaign=3f9a226f8b-OREF-ABOS+Grant+December+2018+LOI&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_dafe61738f-3f9a226f8b-60800801  The Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) and the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) announce the availability of a grant award to advance simulation as a tool for skills training and determine whether it could be used for performance assessment of orthopaedic residents prior to qualifying for their certifying examinations throughout the country. Projects that have or develop measurable outcomes, benchmarks for performance and proficiency levels will be preferred. Funding: $150,000 to $300,000 grant over a 2-3 year period. Letter of Intent Due: December 14, 2018.
 
ResMed Foundation – Clinical Research Grants Program ($250,000 award, two CY 2019 funding cycles: March 15th and August 15th).http://www.resmedfoundation.org/funding/scientific-research.php The Foundation's key mission is to promote novel research as well as public and physician awareness of sleep disordered breathing (SDB), with a primary focus on positive airway pressure therapies and ventilation-based treatments. The Foundation will consider proposals focused on the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment and management of SDB and other respiratory disorders. Research areas of interest are also other morbidities that are associated with SDB which include cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and morbid obesity. In the cardiovascular area, there is a particular emphasis on hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Other areas of focus are: SDB in conjunction with occupational health safety, asthma and anesthesiology; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and, pregnancy/preeclampsia. Specific focus is on outcomes that can influence clinical practice in the near term. Public and physician awareness of SDB is also an area of interest, however only programs that have wide outreach will be considered. The Foundation is also interested in the application of novel screening and diagnostic tools to identify more easily SDB/OSA, as well as new and better paradigms to improve patient adherence and compliance with positive airway pressure and ventilation-based treatment methods. The Foundation aims to provide grants totaling about $1 million each year to support sleep disordered breathing research where grants typically are limited to about $250,000 over the term of the study
 
The Macy Faculty Scholars Program is designed to identify and nurture the careers of promising educational innovators in medicine and nursing. The program aims to develop the next generation of national leaders in medical and nursing education. The program will support the Macy Faculty Scholars in leading new educational innovations at their home institutions and will provide opportunities for further career development through national meetings and participation in other Macy activities. The Foundation seeks nursing and medical school faculty who are committed to careers in health professional education, have served for five or more years as a faculty member, are innovators, and have shown promise as future leaders. The award is up to $100,000 (plus fringe) per year for two years. We will hold an informational webinar for interested applicants on December 12, 2018, at 1pm ET. Applications for the 2019 Macy Faculty Scholars Program are open and due February 13, 2019, by 3pm ET.
 
Bosarge Family Foundation – Waun Ki Hong Scholar Award for Regenerative Medicine ($120,000 award, deadline January 10th, 2019).  https://www.aacr.org/Funding/Pages/Funding-Detail.aspx?ItemID=85 The Bosarge Family Foundation-Waun Ki Hong Scholar Award for Regenerative Cancer Medicine represents a joint effort to encourage and support postdoctoral or clinical research fellows to conduct highly novel and provocative research in the field of regenerative cancer medicine and to establish a successful career path in this field. The research proposed for funding may be translational, clinical, or epidemiological in nature and must have direct applicability and relevance to enhancing the physiology or function of cancer survivors using regenerative medicine techniques. This award provides a two-year grant of $120,000 to support the salary and benefits of the fellow while working on mentored research focused on regenerative cancer medicine.
 
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation – Application of Metagenomic Next Generation Sequencing to Detect and Identify Pathogens ($100,000 award, deadline December 5th, 2018).  https://gcgh.grandchallenges.org/challenge/application-metagenomic-next-generation-sequencing-detect-and-identify-pathogens-round-22 Recognizing barriers for adoption of next-generation sequencing in global health, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has partnered with the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to enable patients in low- and middle-resource settings to benefit from cutting-edge pathogen detection and discovery. This partnership will provide highly specialized training in biosample preparation and sequencing to technical staff from awardee global health centers. Trainees will learn to use the open-source, open-access IDseq software developed by CZ-Biohub for the global health community to upload and analyze patient sequencing data. The BMGF-CZ-Biohub partnership will therefore aim to provide selected applicants the benefits of onsite next generation sequencing and rapid pathogen detection to better understand their local pathogen landscape. We are specifically seeking projects that endeavor to build upon their initial locally-focused effort to contribute to future data-informed decision-making at the population level via data sharing and pathogen data comparison across sites. Through this GCE award, BMGF will support travel and accommodation of grantees for pilot analysis of samples from their home region during hands-on, intensive mentoring provided by the CZ-Biohub in San Francisco. This 2-week instructional period will include both biochemical sample preparation for sequencing and bioinformatic analysis using the IDseq software platform. Specifically, the hands-on training for bench scientists will include best practices and standards for sample processing, DNA & RNA extraction, library preparation and data analysis on the Global IDseq software platform. Upon completion of training at CZ-Biohub, laboratory teams are expected to use the remaining GCE award primarily on the following items: 1) a sequencer1,2 suitable for the global health environment, 2) a dedicated sequencing technician, and 3) sequencing reagents for the duration of the award. The combination of intensive training with molecular, capital equipment, reagent, and personnel support is intended to maximize the potential for sustainable, prospective, onsite analysis of patient samples upon return to the home site. Molecular data generated at individual global sites is intended to be linked and automatically aggregated into IDseq for referencing by all participating clinics and associated sites. This method of local sequence analysis coupled with cross-site comparison could serve as a model for a process that would eventually lead to a network of pathogen detection nodes that could provide increased global transparency into regional pathogen distribution in an accurate and timely manner.