Andrew Ludlow

Andrew Ludlow, Ph.D

Assistant Professor of Integrative Molecular Genetics

Biography

Andrew T. Ludlow received his Ph.D. in Kinesiology (Exercise Physiology) from the University of Maryland in 2011, where he trained under the mentorship of Stephen M. Roth. He then went on to perform postdoctoral research in the joint laboratory of Jerry Shay and Woodring Wright. The common theme of Dr. Ludlow’s research training has been telomeres and telomerase. While at UT Southwestern, Dr. Ludlow received a Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) from the NCI/NIH. His postdoctoral training focused on two areas of research. The first was focused on understanding the chromatin induced regulation of gene expression by changes in telomere length (i.e., aging). The second was understanding the regulation of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, hTERT, by alternative splicing. Dr. Ludlow’s current NCI funding is to study the alternative splicing regulation of telomerase in cancer. Dr. Ludlow arrived in Ann Arbor September of 2017 and joined the School of Kinesiology as an Assistant Professor.

Research Interests

Broadly, research in Dr. Ludlow’s laboratory aims to understand telomere biology in stem cells, aging, and cancer. Our research focuses on how telomeres (the protective caps at the end of each DNA strand) and telomerase (an enzyme that maintains and lengthens telomeres) are regulated and how they become dysfunctional in aging and cancer.

Currently we are focused on three areas related to cancer:

  1. How the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) is regulated by alternative splicing both in cancer cells and during transformation (i.e., how is telomerase reactivated?).
  2. The regulation of splicing factors in cancer.
  3. Determining if there is a link between telomere biology, lifestyle factors such as exercise and diet, and cancer progression.

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