Kimberly McKee PhD MPH

Kimberly S. McKee, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Assistant Professor

Address

Department of Family Medicine
University of Michigan Medical School
1018 Fuller St.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-1213

Administrative Contact

Biography

Dr. Kimberly S. McKee is the principal investigator of a study on the maternal vaginal microbiome, titled “Validation of Maternal Vaginal Microbiota Signatures in Pregnancy: The ECHO Vaginal Microbiome Consortium,” funded by the National Institutes of Health and the ECHO Opportunities and Infrastructure Fund (OIF).

Dr. McKee’s funded research assesses the maternal microbiome in pregnancy and its association with birth and infant outcomes. She is also a co-Investigator of a state-wide cohort study that is part of the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) (http://echochildren.org) longitudinal study of maternal and child health across a range of exposures and child health outcomes.

About the Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program: ECHO is a nationwide research program supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Launched in 2016, the program is designed to understand the effects of a broad range of early environmental influences on child health and development. It consists of existing and ongoing observational studies that comprise the ECHO-wide Cohort of more than 50,000 children, as well as the IDeA States Pediatric Clinical Trials Network to provide access for rural or underserved children to state-of-the-art clinical trials. ECHO’s mission is to enhance the health of children for generations to come. For more information, visit echochildren.org.

Areas of Interest

  • Translational maternal and child health research, including biological mechanisms of preterm birth and adverse birth outcomes
  • The microbiome in pregnancy and its reproductive and child health correlates
  • Women’s health across the life course

Published Articles via PubMed

My hope is that one day, mothers and families will not have to hear, "I'm sorry, but there is not much that we can do for you, and statistically, it is likely to happen again to you." (see below about our son)-- that we can make pregnancy safer for all mothers and their children.