Protein Localization, Identification, and Folding Core

The Protein Localization, Identification, and Folding (PLIF) Core combines proteomics and cell imaging. The included facilities serve as critical platforms to study many biological functions that contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases in the gastrointestinal tract. Core leaders and managers will provide scientific advice by meeting with GI Center investigators and help with the planning, initiation, implementation and dissemination of new and innovative techniques in proteomics, cell imaging, and protein folding.
      
The localization component of the Core is located in dedicated space in the Departments of Physiology and Medicine and utilizes microscopes in the Medical School’s Morphology and Image Analysis Laboratory (MIL) and in the Morphology and Image Analysis Core (MIAC) of the Michigan Diabetes Research Center. Center members will have access to imaging, with use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging.  In addition, electron microscopy and immunogold labeling of fixed and embedded specimens is available for ultrastructural analysis. A new feature in this reapplication is the Aperio Digital Pathology system for high-resolution imaging of whole slides. 
     
The proteomic resource facility (PRF) provides our Center members with high-end mass spectrometry instrumentation dedicated for proteomic analysis and highly skilled expertise in proteomics. PRF is located in the Department of Pathology and houses two state-of-the-art mass spectrometers.
     
The protein folding facility  uses U-M Medical School Protein Folding Diseases (PFD) Initiative that was launched in 2013. The PFD is one of two heavily invested initiatives and offers a ‘resource library’ that includes: a proteomics service that performs routine and highly specialized mass spectrometry with bioinformatics support, a mouse genetic model library, a rodent tissue bank, an antibody reagent library, and access to pilot awards.

Contact Us

Asma Nusrat, MD
Core Co-Director
734-764-5712
anusrat@med.umich.edu

Yatrik Shah, PhD
Core Co-Director 
734-615-0567
shahy@umich.edu

John Williams, MD, PhD
Core Associate Director – Imaging
734-647-2886
jawillms@med.umich.edu

Alexey Nesvizhskii, PhD
Core Associate Director – Proteomics
734-615-5510 or 734-647-3516
nesvi@med.umich.edu

General Information

The Protein Localization, Identification and Folding (PLIF) Core is a further evolution of our most recent Protein Identification and Localization (PIL) Core that combines proteomics and cell imaging. The included facilities serve as critical platforms to study many biological functions that contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases in the gastrointestinal tract. This Core has been critical in facilitating member research programs in the past funding period with 76% of center members using the PLIF Core, contributing to 116 peer-reviewed publications since 2010. The selection of current Core services is based on past usage and recent member survey. The Core leadership has expanded previous facilities to include emerging techniques that will be provided by highly trained individuals. The importance of the PLIF Core is in part due to provision of access to specialized equipment and techniques not available in individual Center members’ laboratories, and also because of the services it provides are in high demand. It is built around more than 90 years of GI and Liver proteomic, cell biology and imaging expertise of Drs. Nusrat (our new Core Co-Director), Omary, and Williams. Dr. Nusrat was recently recruited to the University of Michigan and has previously directed a Digestive Disease Mini-Center image analysis and flow cytometry Core at Emory University. Our new Associate Director Dr. Alexey Nesvizhskii has extensive experience in proteomics and bioinformatics. Also included are experienced Core staff Dr. Basrur and Mr. Nelson who will assist Center Investigators (as managers) and carry out critical Core procedures. Core leaders and managers will provide scientific advice by meeting with GI Center investigators and help with the planning, initiation, implementation and dissemination of new and innovative techniques in proteomics, cell imaging and protein folding.
      
The localization component of the Core is located in dedicated space in the Departments of Physiology and Medicine and utilizes microscopes in the Medical School’s Morphology and Image Analysis Laboratory (MIL) and in the Morphology and Image Analysis Core (MIAC) of the Michigan Diabetes Research Center (supported by an NIDDK P30 led by Dr. Martin Myers). Center members will have access to imaging, with use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging.  In addition, electron microscopy and immunogold labeling of fixed and embedded specimens is available for ultrastructural analysis. A new feature in this reapplication is the Aperio Digital Pathology system for high-resolution imaging of whole slides. 
     
The proteomic resource facility (PRF) provides our Center members with high-end mass spectrometry instrumentation dedicated for proteomic analysis and highly skilled expertise in proteomics. The PRF has undertaken several important steps to provide state-of-the-art facilities. PRF is located in the Department of Pathology and houses 2 state-of-the-art mass spectrometers including the most recent acquisition of a high-resolution, ultra-fast and sensitive Q Exactive HF. This facility is headed by Dr. Alexey Nesviszhskii who serves as the PLIF Core Associate Director. 
     
The protein folding facility uses University of Michigan Medical School Protein Folding Diseases (PFD) Initiative that was launched in 2013 with a $9.3 M commitment from the Medical School. Dr. Omary serves on the Internal Advisory Committee of the PFD, and is a member of the PFD initiative investigator group together with 4 other members of our center. The PFD is one of two heavily invested initiatives (the second being the microbiome initiative which is now also linked in with our Center Microbiome and Metabolomics Core). The PFD initiative offers a ‘resource library’ that includes: a proteomics service that performs routine and highly specialized mass spectrometry with bioinformatics support, a mouse genetic model library, a rodent tissue bank, an antibody reagent library, and access to pilot awards.