Brian George

Brian C. George, MD

Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Acute Care/Trauma
Assistant Professor of Learning Health Sciences
Associate Program Director, General Surgery Residency
Associate Program Director, Surgical Critical Care Fellowship
Director of Educational Research, Center for Health Outcomes and Policy (CHOP)
Executive Director, Center for Surgical Training and Research (C-STAR)
Executive Director, Procedural Learning and Safety Collaborative (PLSC)

 

Administrative Contact

Biography

Dr. George is a trauma and emergency surgeon whose research bridges the gap between surgical education and health services (i.e. patient outcomes) research.  This multidisciplinary approach aims to understand the impact of surgical trainee competence on early-career patient outcomes and then use that data to develop patient-centered standards for surgical training.  He collaborates widely in his role as the Executive Director of a multi-institutional non-profit research consortium (Procedural Learning and Safety Collaborative).  He is also the Executive Director of the Center for Surgical Training and Research and the Director of Educational Research at the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy, both at the University of Michigan.  He has several educational administrative roles and mentors numerous medical students, residents, and fellows both clinically and in research.  He lives in Ann Arbor with his wife and two children.

 

Areas of Interest

  • Theoretical and empiric models of procedural technical skill acquisition
  • Factors influencing faculty supervision and resident autonomy in the operating room
  • Impact of intra-operative teaching and learning on patient safety

Other Professional Highlights: 

Dr. George recently published a prospective, multi-institutional trial that investigated the readiness of graduating general surgery residents for independent practice.  This study, the largest of its kind, was coordinated through the Procedural Learning and Safety Collaborative and was funded by the American Board of Surgery. The primary conclusion was that general surgery residents are not competent to perform many Core general surgery procedures by the time they graduate.  This study has proven to be a call for action and is already spurring further studies and interventions.

Published Articles or Reviews

George, B.C., Teitelbaum, E.N., Meyerson, S.L., Schuller, M.C., DaRosa, D.A., Petrusa, E.R., Petito, L.C., and Fryer, J.P. (2014). Reliability, Validity, and Feasibility of the Zwisch Scale for the Assessment of Intraoperative Performance. J Surg Educ 71, 90–96.

George, B.C., Bohnen, J.D., Williams, R.G., Meyerson, S.L., Schuller, M.C., Clark, M.J., Meier, A.H., Torbeck, L., Mandell, S.P., Mullen, J.T., et al. (2017). Readiness of US General Surgery Residents for Independent Practice. Annals of Surgery 266, 582–594.

Williams, R.G., Swanson, D.B., Fryer, J.P., Meyerson, S.L., Bohnen, J.D., Dunnington, G.L., Scully, R.E., Schuller, M.C., and George, B.C. (2017). How Many Observations are Needed to Assess a Surgical Trainee’s State of Operative Competency? Annals of Surgery. ePublish ahead of print

George, B.C., Dunnington, G.L., DaRosa, D.A. (2017)  Trainee Autonomy and Patient Safety.  Annals of Surgery.  In press

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