Courses

For successful degree completion, at least 34 graduate credit hours must be completed in approved physiology and other science-related courses.
For Coursework Track students, enrollment in a 3-credit Capstone Project is required in the Spring half-term.
For Research Track students, 6 credits of independent research are required in the Fall term, 8 credits of independent research are required in the Winter term, and enrollment in a 3-credit Research Capstone Project is required in the Summer half-term.

For M.S. in Physiology, Coursework Track:

FALL SEMESTER: 

Core Courses:
  • Physiol 404 (2 cr): Human Physiology Laboratory, T OR Th 1-3pm
    or, if you have already taken Physiol 404 (or its equivalent at another institution), you will enroll in:
    Physiol 505 (2 cr): Advanced Physiology Laboratory, F 12:30-3:30pm
  • Physiol 502 (4 cr): Human Physiology, MWF 8:30-10am
    If you have successfully completed this course or its equivalent (with a grade of B- or better) at another institution, then Physiol 506 is required.
    or
    Physiol 506 (3 cr): Extreme Physiology, TTh 10-11:30am
    You may enroll in BOTH Physiol 502 and Physiol 506 if your schedule allows.
  • Physiol 605 (1 cr): Professional Development Seminar, W 3-4pm
  • Anat 403 (5 cr): Human Anatomy: Structure & Function, MWF 10am-12pm
    *Note, if you have successfully completed this course or its equivalent at another institution, you are eligible to select an elective course (see below).  
  • Biostat 521 (2 cr): Applied Biostatistics, TTh 10am-12pm
    *Note, if you have successfully completed this course or its equivalent at another institution, you are eligible to select an elective course (see below).  
  • PIBS 503 (1 cr): Research Responsibility and Ethics, 7 lectures offered at various times throughout the semester (TBA).
    Research Track students are required to enroll in PIBS 503, but Coursework Track students who have successfully completed an approved ethics course are not required to enroll in PIBS 503.
Elective Course Options:

If you have successfully completed Anat 403 (Human Anatomy: Structure & Function) and/or Biostat 521 (Applied Biostatistics), or their equivalent(s) at another institution, you are eligible to select an elective course:

  • Physiol 506 (3 cr): Extreme Physiology, TTh 10-11:30am
    If you have successfully completed Physiol 502 or its equivalent (with a grade of B- or better) at another institution, then Physiol 506 is required. You may enroll in BOTH Physiol 502 and Physiol 506 if your schedule allows.
  • Physiol 576 (1 cr, mini-course): Signal Transduction, MWF 10-11am                       
  • CDB 530 (3 cr): Cell Biology, MW 1-3pm
  • Epid 515 (3 cr): Genetics in Public Health, MW 8:30-10am
  • Humgen 541 (3 cr): Molecular Genetics, MWF 9-10am
  • MCDB 428 (4 cr): Cell Biology, MWF 11am-12pm
  • MCDB 436 (3 cr): Human Immunology, MW 1-2:30pm
  • MCDB 447 (3 cr): Lysosomes & Diseases, TTh 4-5:30pm
  • MCDB 451 (3 cr): Molecular Neurobiology of Health & Disease, MW 10-11:30am
  • Microbiol 405 (3 cr): Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease, TTh 10-11:30am
  • Microbiol 460 (3 cr): Eukaryotic Microbiology, TTh 1-2:30pm
  • Pharmacology 601 (3 cr): From Molecules to Patients: Basic Quantitative Principles of Pharmacology, MWF 9-10am
    From Molecules to Patients: Basic Quantitative Principles of Pharmacology.
    This is a graduate level course that examines the fundamental principles of pharmacology and their quantitative treatment as a basis for understanding the properties and mechanism of action of drugs. The course is aimed at, but not limited to students of Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Chemical Biology, Toxicology, Bioinformatics or Biological Chemistry. Topics include: Structure and physical properties of drugs; quantitative structure-activity and dose-response relationships; receptors as determinants of drug action; concepts, analysis and modeling of agonists, antagonists, and receptor mechanisms; signal amplification, selectivity, and regulation; drug absorption, distribution and metabolism; modern approaches to drug design.                                                                   

Note: The following sociology courses are electives for pre-dental students only (the University of Michigan School of Dentistry requires a graded sociology lecture course):

Typical Fall Schedule for a Coursework Track Student:
 

WINTER SEMESTER: 

Core Courses:
Very Highly Recommended Courses:
Elective Course Options:
Typical Winter Schedule for a Coursework Track Student, Plus an Elective: 
 

SPRING SEMESTER:

  

For M.S. in Physiology, Research Track

FALL SEMESTER: 

Core Courses:
  • Physiol 404 (2 cr): Human Physiology Laboratory, T OR Th 1-3pm
    or, if you have already taken Physiol 404 (or its equivalent at another institution), you will enroll in:
    Physiol 505 (2 cr): Advanced Physiology Laboratory, F 12:30-3:30pm
  • Physiol 502 (4 cr): Human Physiology, MWF 8:30-10am
    If you have successfully completed Physiol 502 or its equivalent (with a grade of B- or better) at another institution, then Physiol 506 is required.
    or
    Physiol 506 (3 cr): Extreme Physiology, TTh 10-11:30am
    You may enroll in BOTH Physiol 502 and Physiol 506 if your schedule allows.
  • Physiol 605 (1 cr): Professional Development Seminar, W 3-4pm
  • Physiol 702 (6 cr): Physiology Masters Research Project
  • PIBS 503 (1 cr): Research Responsibility and Ethics, 7 lectures offered at various times throughout the semester (TBA).
    Research Track students are required to enroll in PIBS 503, but Coursework Track students who have successfully completed an approved ethics course are not required to enroll in PIBS 503. 
Very Highly Recommended Course:
Elective Course Options:

*Note, if you have not successfully completed an appropriate statistics course, you will be encouraged to take Biostat 521 (Applied Biostatistics). 

  • Physiol 506 (3 cr): Extreme Physiology, TTh 10-11:30am
    If you have successfully completed Physiol 502 or its equivalent (with a grade of B- or better) at another institution, then Physiol 506 is required. You may enroll in BOTH Physiol 502 and Physiol 506 if your schedule allows.
  • Physiol 576 (1 cr, mini-course): Signal Transduction, MWF 10-11am
  • Anat 403 (5 cr): Human Anatomy: Structure & Function, MWF 10am-12pm
  • CDB 530 (3 cr): Cell Biology, MW 1-3pm
  • Epid 515 (3 cr): Genetics in Public Health, MW 8:30-10am
  • Humgen 541 (3 cr): Molecular Genetics, MWF 9-10am
  • MCDB 428 (4 cr): Cell Biology, MWF 11am-12pm
  • MCDB 436 (3 cr): Human Immunology, MW 1-2:30pm
  • MCDB 447 (3 cr): Lysosomes & Diseases, TTh 4-5:30pm
  • MCDB 451 (3 cr): Molecular Neurobiology of Health & Disease, MW 10-11:30am
  • Microbiol 405 (3 cr): Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease, TTh 10-11:30am
  • Microbiol 460 (3 cr): Eukaryotic Microbiology, TTh 1-2:30pm
  • Pharmacology 601 (3 cr): From Molecules to Patients: Basic Quantitative Principles of Pharmacology, MWF 9-10am
    From Molecules to Patients: Basic Quantitative Principles of Pharmacology.
    This is a graduate level course that examines the fundamental principles of pharmacology and their quantitative treatment as a basis for understanding the properties and mechanism of action of drugs. The course is aimed at, but not limited to students of Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Chemical Biology, Toxicology, Bioinformatics or Biological Chemistry. Topics include: Structure and physical properties of drugs; quantitative structure-activity and dose-response relationships; receptors as determinants of drug action; concepts, analysis and modeling of agonists, antagonists, and receptor mechanisms; signal amplification, selectivity, and regulation; drug absorption, distribution and metabolism; modern approaches to drug design. 

Note: The following sociology courses are electives for pre-dental students only (the University of Michigan School of Dentistry requires a graded sociology lecture course):

 

Typical Fall Schedule for a Research Track Student: 
 

WINTER SEMESTER: 

Core Courses:
Very Highly Recommended Course:
Elective Course Options:
Typical Winter Schedule for a Research Track Student: 
 

 SPRING SEMESTER*:

  • Although you do not register for any courses (and therefore do not pay tuition), you are expected to continue to develop your research project and work in your research laboratory. Research students must complete a minimum of 11 months in a laboratory (with typically 1 additional month to write and present the final project) to be awarded the M.S. degree. 

SUMMER SEMESTER*:

*If a student arranges to start in their laboratory prior to the Fall term, they may be able to finish the program earlier. Examples of early start dates for research are July 1 (may then be finished by mid-June and would register for Spring half-term) or August 1 (may then be finished by mid-July and would register for Summer half-term).

If eligible:

Physiology 703 (3 cr, Spring half-term): Physiology Masters Research Project