Residency

The Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery provides exceptional residency training. Under the guidance of dedicated faculty, residents receive in-depth instruction in all facets of otolaryngology and develop skills that equip them to exceed the highest standards of patient care and research.

Four residency positions are available each year. Three of these positions are dedicated to our five-year clinical training program and one to our six-year Advanced Research Training in Otolaryngology Program. While at Michigan, residents are trained in the following:

  • Cranial Base Surgery
  • Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • General Otolaryngology
  • Head and Neck Oncology
  • Laryngology
  • Otology/Neurotology
  • Pediatric Otolaryngology
  • Rhinology

Small group and departmental teaching conferences occur throughout the program. Didactic teachings include weekly lectures, grand rounds and laboratory sessions.  Special courses are given in temporal bone surgery, head and neck oncology, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, microvascular surgery, nasal endoscopy and research techniques.

Residents complete 6-18 months of research, depending on their program track.  Results are presented during the annual Charles J. Krause Lectureship and submitted for publication.

Overall, it is our goal to develop residents who have expertise and knowledge in the diagnosis, management and research of otolaryngic conditions.

Clinical Training

The U-M Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residency program offers a robust clinical training experience. This is a summary of the academic structure of the training program.

5-Year Clinical Training Program

Our five-year program offers a balance of inpatient, outpatient, operative and research experience. Residents in this program spend six months doing research during their PGY-4 year.

6-Year Advanced Research Training in Otolaryngology Program

Like our five-year residency program, our six-year Advanced Research Training in Otolaryngology Program offers a balance of inpatient, outpatient, operative and research experience. Residents in our six-year program spend an additional 12 months doing research, which begins during the PGY-3 year, for a total of 18 research months.

Program Rotations

The department is divided into the following services:

  • Blue: Head and Neck Oncology
  • Maize: Facial Plastics and Reconstructive Surgery, General Otolaryngology, Laryngology, Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery
  • Mott: Pediatric Otolaryngology
  • Otology: Otology-Neurotology
  • V.A.: Veteran's Administration Hospital(link is external)
  • Research: 6-month or 18-month Research Rotation

PGY-1 

PGY-1 residents are assigned to twelve, one-month rotations. Residents spend six months on rotations outside of the department, primarily rotating with general surgery services as well as with neurosurgery. The remainder of the year is spent in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Rotation (six months)

PGY-1 residents spend six months working in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. During this time, they rotate through our pediatric otolaryngology and head and neck oncology services. This rotation structure exposes residents to otolaryngologic scenarios across the spectrum, providing a balance of clinic, inpatient, consultation and operative experience, resulting in an abundance of learning opportunities. Through numerous conferences, rounds and lectures offered throughout the year, the PGY-1 residents are also introduced to the department's academic endeavors.

Perhaps one of the most unique aspects of the PGY-1 year is the Otolaryngology Clinical Skills Period. During this one-month focused educational rotation, the entire PGY-1 class spends two weeks with the head and neck anesthesia team and two weeks focusing on ear, nose and throat skills development. Activities include simulation, didactics and dedicated clinical experiences.

Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Rotation (three months)

During the otolaryngology - head and neck surgery rotation, PGY-1 residents spend six weeks on our Gold Service. During this time, PGY-1 resident also spend Thursdays with our Green Service, corresponding with the Green Service Otology Conference and temporal bone drilling. Residents spend at least one day with audiology, speech language pathology and the vestibular laboratory. The remaining six weeks are spent on the Mott Service. This rotation structure exposes residents to otolaryngic scenarios across the spectrum, providing a balance of clinic, inpatient, consultation and operative experience, resulting in an abundance of learning opportunities. Through numerous conferences, rounds and lectures offered throughout the year, the PGY-1 residents are also introduced to the department's academic endeavors.

PGY-2

PGY-2 residents spend three months each on the Maize, Mott, Blue and Otology services. These rotations afford PGY-2 residents the opportunity to obtain a strong base of knowledge and experience upon which to build. There is a balance between the clinic and operative experience and a strong emphasis on developing and acquiring the skills and knowledge required to care for patients. System-based practice and the concepts of patient-based learning are also emphasized. Residents have the opportunity to enhance their written and verbal communication skills when communicating with other clinicians and presenting during teaching rounds and conferences. PYG-2 residents take call with senior resident backup.

PGY-3

PGY-3 residents spend three months each on the Blue and V.A. services and six months on the Maize service. PGY-3 residents are expected to take on more responsibility for patient care, teaching and organization under the supervision of faculty and senior residents. They make significant progress in the area of medical knowledge and offer more substantial contributions to case discussions at rounds and conferences. With the assistance of faculty, PGY-3 residents select a research project and complete a research proposal for presentation to the Research Committee and at the Charles J. Krause, M.D., Lectureship. PGY-3 residents continue to take call with senior resident backup.

PGY-4

PGY-4 residents spend three months each on the Mott and Otology services, assuming chief resident responsibilities during these months. This gives residents the opportunity to develop and improve their leadership, organizational and communication skills. PGY-4 residents have increased responsibility for supervising and teaching junior residents and students and organizing rotations to ensure work is distributed fairly and appropriately among the service team members. They are expected to develop, communicate and carry out complete treatment plans under faculty supervision. The remaining six months are spent completing a research project. This work is presented during the Charles J. Krause, M.D., Lectureship and submitted for publication. PGY-4 residents contribute substantially during case discussions, rounds and conferences. They also take back-up senior call.

PGY-5

PGY-5 residents are the chief residents on the Blue, Maize and V.A. services. These rotations demand excellent organizational, communication and leadership skills. Junior residents and students are assigned to these services, so PGY-5 residents have an excellent opportunity to hone their teaching skills. In addition, they are expected to lead discussions at rounds and conferences. PGY-5 residents perform complex procedures under the supervision of faculty, and supervise junior residents performing less-complex procedures. They have the opportunity to act as consultants, developing and communicating diagnostic and treatment plans to consulting services with faculty supervision. PGY-5 residents provide back-up senior call.

Benefits

Our residents receive a competitive benefits package, which includes:

  • Medical, Dental, Hospitalization and Pharmacy Coverage
  • Life, Disability, and Malpractice Coverage
  • Vacation and Holiday Pay
  • Retirement Savings

House officers at the University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) are represented by the University of Michigan House Officers Association. The Association is authorized by the State of Michigan to negotiate contracts with UMHS. Information regarding salaries and the above-mentioned benefits are detailed in the current contract. This information is available on the House Officers Association website and through the University of Michigan Office of Staff Benefits.

Educational Activities

Our residents benefit from a variety of educational opportunities.

Temporal Bone Lab

Department-Wide

  • Discharge Planning Rounds (weekly)
  • Grand Rounds (weekly)
  • Resident Didactic Conference (weekly)
  • Morbidity and Mortality Rounds (monthly)
  • Research Committee Conference (monthly)
  • Journal Club (7 per year)
  • Anatomic Dissections (two, weekend-long sessions per year)
  • Temporal Bone Dissection Course (PGY-4)
  • ORL Essentials Boot Camp (PGY-1 and PGY-2)
  • Charles J. Krause, M.D., Lectureship (annually)
  • Lawrence-Hawkins Symposium (annually)
  • Michigan Work Society Meeting (bi-annually)

Service-Specific

  • Blue Team Teaching Rounds (weekly)
  • Maize Team Teaching Rounds (weekly)
  • Hearing and Special Senses Seminar (weekly)
  • Otology Conference (weekly)
  • Pediatric Otolaryngology Team Teaching Rounds (weekly)
  • Rhinology/Sinus Conference (weekly)
  • Temporal Bone Laboratory (weekly)
  • U-M Head and Neck Tumor Board (weekly)
  • V.A. Tumor Board (weekly)
  • V.A. Teaching Rounds (bi-weekly)

Other

  • American Academy of Otolaryngology Home Study Course
  • American Academy of Otolaryngology In-Service Examination

ORL Essentials Boot Camp

Residents encounter difficult and emergent airway situations throughout their training. Our simulation program gives residents the opportunity to learn and practice new skills and procedures in nearly real situations without risk of injury to a patient. It is also provides an effective means of assessing competency. Training opportunities include the annual ORL Essentials Boot Camp.

 

Extracurricular Activities

There is no shortage of fun in our department.

Spring Fling

Every year, the entire department kicks back and has some fun at Spring Fling. This social event features food, music, dancing, casino games and prizes. Department faculty, staff, trainees and their families are invited to attend the complementary event. It's an evening of laughter and fun.

Residency Class of 2016

Residency and Fellowship Graduation

It's bittersweet to send off our graduating residents and fellows to the next stage of their careers, but we do it in style during our Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Fellowship and Residency Graduation Dinner. Attendees enjoy dinner and drinks while getting a few laughs in during the Faculty Roast and saying goodbye to our graduates. It's one of the best evenings of the year. 

Living in Ann Arbor

The University of Michigan is located in Ann Arbor, a small cosmopolitan city in the southeast corner of Michigan, approximately one hour west of the greater Detroit metropolitan area and only a twenty minute drive from the Detroit Metropolitan International Airport. With a population of approximately 125,000, Ann Arbor combines the congenial atmosphere and ease of living of a small city with the wide range of cultural opportunities typically found in a much larger community. Intercalation of the University of Michigan campus and the city of Ann Arbor provides easy access to these activities and to an abundance of affordable and conveniently located housing. As a place to live, Ann Arbor regularly places within the top 20 communities in the country in national magazine ratings.

Summer Festival
Photo credit: VisitAnnArbor.com

Culture

The University serves as a focus for art, music and theatrical performance. The city itself also has a lively arts scene and offers an abundant array of restaurants, microbreweries, coffee houses, jazz, blues and rock clubs, museums and other entertainment. Ann Arbor's proximity to Detroit provides the advantages of life in a major metropolitan area - cultural events, museums, professional sporting events-without the attendant disadvantages of urban life. Chicago, Toronto and other major metropolitan areas are within a four hour trip by car or train, providing access to the distinct array of events these cities have to offer.

Biking
Photo credit: VisitAnnArbor.com

Adventure

Over 140 parks in the city and surrounding areas offer countless possibilities for outdoor activities, from boating on the Huron River to biking, rollerblading and hiking, and in the winter cross-country skiing, skating and other outdoor activities. Chains of inland lakes and an abundance of streams and rivers offer adventurous canoeing and fishing opportunities. In addition, Ann Arbor is only a few hours from the sandy beaches of Lake Michigan, the wild shorelines of Lakes Superior and Huron and the deep forests and campsites along the waters of the Upper Peninsula. The combination of cultural, outdoor and sporting activities, excellent restaurants and a lively community make Ann Arbor a terrific place for graduate and postdoctoral studies.

Michigan Union
Photo credit: VisitAnnArbor.com

University of Michigan

The University of Michigan, chartered in 1817, has one of the most vibrant research communities in the United States, ranking second nationally in overall research expenditures and rated as one of the best public universities in the country (U.S. News and World Report). The Medical School, in particular, has ranked in the top ten schools nationally in NIH funding for nearly two decades. The student body is large and diverse. About 60 percent of the students are engaged in undergraduate studies and 40 percent are in graduate or professional schools. The 2,500-acre University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor is both integrated into the city and rich in natural settings. There is also a network of inspiring museums including the Exhibit Museums, featuring the Museum of Art, a Hall of Evolution, the Ruthven Planetarium, the Kelsey Museum of Archeology, the University Herbarium and the President Gerald R. Ford Museum. The intellectual, cultural and environmental components of the University of Michigan work together to provide a comfortable home to thousands of students, postdoctoral trainees, faculty and staff.

For More Information

Check out these sites for the latest on Ann Arbor news and events:

Resident Wellness

Thrive! Stress Management Program

It's not only about managing stress, it's about learning how to thrive! The MHealthy Thrive! Program is a comprehensive stress management and prevention program that aims to foster psychological well-being by energizing work climates, enhancing relationships, and maximizing personal strength. 

UMHS Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

As members of the UMHS community, we understand the challenges and joys of working in a health care system and the need for meaning, pleasure, and engagement in our lives. Whether you are concerned about your health, relationships, or work, we exist to serve you. We offer a wide range of personal and professional development services. 

Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (FASAP)

The Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (FASAP) provides support and assistance to University staff and faculty in resolving personal or work related concerns. Through a range of sensitive and innovative services, FASAP seeks to enhance the emotional health, well-being and job performance of members of the university community. By providing confidential and professional counseling, coaching, training, and consultation services to staff, faculty, retirees, benefit-eligible dependents and departments, FASAP helps individuals develop and foster strengths and resiliency to enhance their personal and professional lives.

MHealthy Fitness Center

MHealthy Fitness Center in Ann Arbor is a medically-based fitness center. Our highly-trained staff and non-judgmental atmosphere make this a safe and welcoming place for people of all ages, abilities and sizes to work out. Daily passes and three-, six-, and twelve-month memberships are available. 

Nutrition Resources

Several tools and links to help with your nutrition goals. 

HOA Connect

HOA Connect is primarily a volunteer organization that facilitates social opportunities for house officers and their families. While the HOA's mission is to support the membership in the workplace, supporting those special people in a house officer's life is also important. 

Exercise and Relaxation Classes

MHealthy Exercise and Relaxation Classes are a great way to get moving, get fit and relieve stress. More than 100 classes are available to U-M faculty, staff, students, and the general public at various locations on or near the University's Ann Arbor campus. 

MHealthy

As the university's health and well-being program, we provide programs and resources designed to help you be your best-physically, mentally, and emotionally. By creating a community of health at U-M, we can make our community a place where healthy living is welcomed and supported. 

Wellness Coaching

A FREE one on one coaching conversation available to undergraduate and graduate students. Wellness coaching is a holistic approach to examining how personal wellness interacts with one's values, goals, and motivations. Wellness coaching could be a good fit if you are considering changes to optimize your personal health and wellness, or looking to positively shift certain aspects of your life. 

Central Campus Recreation Building

Located just minutes from the Diag, the CCRB is the largest Recreational Sports facility. It features a wide array of equipment and amenities to suit a variety of fitness interests. 

Recreational Sports

Whether you've been working out for years of you're new to the gym world, it's our mission to be present and standing by, ready to offer instruction, advice or just a word of encouragement. Members get open access to our machines, weights, courts and pools in the comfort of a supportive environment. 

Department of Recreational Sports

The Department of Recreational Sports (Rec Sports) develops and conducts five major program areas that offer a variety of structure within which members of the U-M community may pursue athletic, fitness, and recreational interests. 

Athletics & Recreation

From its famous winged football helmet and maize-and-blue uniforms - one of the most recognizable icons in American sports - to its domination on the world stage in the Olympics, the University of Michigan intercollegiate athletics program has a long tradition of winning and a legacy of championship teams. 

Wolverine Wellness

We provide information and referrals, provide early intervention, collaborate and consult, influence policy, and advocate for health for the U-M campus community. Well-being infuses our work. 

The Wellness Zone

CAPS Wellness Zone is available for students on a drop-in basis and is located through our office at 3100 Michigan Union! We offer many wellness resources to help you manage stress, rest, and relax as you navigate your busy life as a student at U-M. 

Depression Center

Depression can be a difficult illness to understand, particularly since no two people experience it in the same way. As art of the Depression Center's mission to counteract stigma and prevent recurrences and progression, we provide clear, evidence-based information in a variety of formats to help people understand depression's causes, its symptoms, and prevention and treatment options. 

Research Opportunities

Residents in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery are required to engage in mentored research training throughout the residency period. To support this requirement, residents spend six months doing research during the PGY-4 year. One resident each year pursues an extended 18-month research rotation beginning during the PGY-3 year, through our NIH-supported Advanced Research Training in Otolaryngology Program.

Our residents have been remarkably successful in competing for extramural grants, and research productivity has been impressive. Just in the past few years, resident-initiated projects have created the first 3-D printed airway splint (which made international news and has emerged into a dynamic NIH funded program), designed a prospective randomized controlled trial for perioperative infection prevention, made cutting-edge discoveries in head and neck cancer genomics with immediate translational potential and implemented a lean system for operating room efficiency.

Otolaryngology Resident Research Committee

The department’s Research Committee, co-chaired by Dr. Andrew Shuman and Dr. David Kohrman, continues the department's long history of promoting research excellence among trainees. Residents meet monthly to review progress, assist with grant-writing and manuscript preparation, review research methodology and liaise with departmental faculty. The committee also provides financial support for trainee research projects through the Otolaryngology Resident Research Committee Research Grant. This grant, which awards $10,000 total annually, aims to supplement extramural funding mechanisms in order to foster meaningful and substantive clinical and/or basic science research. Applications for the 2016 grant are due June 10, 2016. Recipients will be announced at the Charles J. Krause, M.D., Lectureship on June 24, 2016. See the grant RFA for more information.

Department Resident Research Awards

Resident studies are presented at the annual Charles J. Krause, M.D., Lectureship, with research awards given for outstanding projects.

  • Paparella Otologic Research Award
  • Rontal Family Resident Education Award
  • John L. Kemink, M.D., Clinical Research Award
  • Merle Lawrence Basic Science Research Award

Publications, Oral Presentations and Poster Presentations

Our residents are expected to present and publish their work throughout their residencies. The department offers financial support for trainees whose research is accepted for presentation at industry meetings and conferences.

Our Residents

How to Apply

The U-M Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residency program participates in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP)(link is external). Applications are accepted exclusively through the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS)(link is external). U.S. medical students should contact their dean's office for more information about ERAS. International medical students should contact the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates(link is external).

2017 Application Deadline

We are accepting applications through Oct. 6.

2017 Interviews

Every year, we interview approximately 45 applicants for four residency positions. Of these residency positions, three are dedicated to our five-year clinical training program and one to our six-year Advanced Research Training in Otolaryngology Program. Interviewees may rank both the clinical track and the research track, as they are treated as two different match programs.

Interviews will take place Dec. 7-8.

 

Marc C. Thorne, M.D., MPH

Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Director, Residency Program, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
Sarah Judson

Sarah Judson

Assistant Residency Program Coordinator
734-936-9178