Active Research

DEVELOPING AN ADAPTIVE INTERVENTION FOR SUICIDAL ADOLESCENTS FOLLOWING INPATIENT HOSPITALIZATION: A PILOT SMART

Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health
Principal Investigator: Ewa Czyz, Ph.D.

This NIMH K award will be used to conduct a Sequential, Multiple Assignment, Randomized Trial (SMART) pilot with teens at risk for suicide (ages 13-17). Given the heterogeneity of responses to intervention and post-discharge suicide risk among suicidal youth, this personalized approach represents a critical first step in developing an innovative, technology-augmented adaptive intervention for hospitalized adolescents aimed at reducing suicide-related outcomes following the transition from inpatient care. Findings from this study will provide the groundwork for the construction of a technology-augmented adaptive intervention that could lead to a reduction in suicidal behaviors and related events during the high-risk post-discharge period—an important suicide prevention target.

PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES FAMILY SUPPORT AND FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

Funded by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services
Principal Investigator: Cynthia Ewell Foster, Ph.D. 

Based on work completed in Michigan’s cohort 5 GLS project and in partnership with the University of Michigan Health System’s Psychiatric Emergency Services (PES), the Family Support and ED Follow-up Program aims to inform enhancements to crisis and emergency care for youth and families. 250-500 families will be enrolled at PES.  Youth ages 10-18 with any suicide-related risk factors are eligible. Youth and parents complete surveys in PES and participate in follow-up surveys online (parents at 3 days and 2 weeks after discharge; youth at 2 weeks after discharge). Surveys are designed to help improve our understanding of how to care for youth seeking emergency services for suicide risk. Eventually, some families will be asked to join a focus group to inform the development of a text-message-based follow-up intervention for parents/caregivers of high risk youth.  Funded by the state-wide youth suicide prevention grant, we hope to disseminate best practices to other emergency departments across Michigan.

TRANSFORMING YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION IN MICHIGAN

Funded by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to State of Michigan
Co-Principal Investigators: Patricia Smith & Cynthia Ewell Foster, Ph.D. 

The TYSP-MI 2 Project is a 3.75 million dollar five year grant awarded to the State of Michigan’s Department of Community Health to support a state-wide public health approach to youth suicide prevention. Focused on sustainable systems change, this grant establishes collaborative relationships between state agencies focused on injury prevention and control, child protective services, behavioral health, and education. The grant provides gatekeeper and clinical provider training and community-based technical assistance, funds state-wide data surveillance initiatives, and supports the development of urban and rural “model communities” working to establish a continuum of best-practice services in their counties.